10 Fresh Ways to Write ‘Please Find Attached’

A while ago, we had a reader asking about the expression “please find attached”:

I see work emails with this sentence, or some variation, frequently and it always seems incorrect to read.

“Please find attached a copy of the resume you requested.”

Is there a less-chunky alternative to this phrase?

 

We know, right? Is it possible to send an email anymore without this phrase?

Please find attached reads like annoying office jargon, so you might wonder whether it’s necessary in an email. The simple answer is no, you do not.

First, this phrase is inane, dated and overly formal. You want to keep a natural tone with your recipients – not sound like a character from a George Elliott novel. Second, this phrase is not even proper grammar. There is no reason to make “attached” an adjective when it’s a verb. A clearer, modern alternative might be: “I’m sharing [item] with you.” Third, this phrase is redundant. Your attachment will show up in the email, so there is no need to announce its existence.

Please find attached alternatives email

When it comes to email writing, less is more.

So, how do you say “Please find attached” in a professional email without sounding too archaic? Would it be better to not write anything and hope the attachment is acknowledged by the recipient?

Well, this is where things get complicated.

A lot of email servers are wary of attachment-transmitted viruses. Unless you want the email server to automatically segment your email as junk, you’ll need to give your reader notice when you send an email attachment. (Note: This shouldn’t be necessary if your work involves sending attachments back and forth.)

Clearer and Engaging Alternatives to ‘Please Find Attached…’

In my line of work, there is no escaping to this phrase: ‘Please find attached’ or ‘Enclosed here’. On an average day, I field about a dozen emails every hour and these aren’t the most upvoted Reddit links nor newsletter. It’s amazing how many times during the day I have to type one of two phrases mentioned above and make my email worth readable.

When you’re sending so many emails every day, it is the little details that matter. One of these details is aptly cutting out words and phrases you don’t necessarily need. A nicely put email shouldn’t be too much to work. In this piece, we discuss how to write useful alternatives to the “please find attached” phrase.

  1. Attach the file with no explanation.
  2. “You’ll find the attachment below.”
  3. “Here is…”
  4. “I’ve attached [item].”
  5. “I’m sharing [item] with you.”
  6. “Please have a look at the attached [item].”
  7. “This [item] has…”
  8. Let me know if you have any questions about the attachment.
  9. “Please review the attached [item] here.”
  10. “Kindly check the attached [item] given here below.”

Option 1: Attach the file with no explanation.

If the sole purpose of sending the email is to share an attachment, then cut the phrase entirely.

Example:

Hey Adam,

We are launching the new campaign on Monday. If you agree, please write back to say “yes,” and we’ll process.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 2: You’ll find the attachment below.

Not much can go wrong when you use this statement. It’s simple and it should suffice in most scenarios.

Example:

Hi Marcie,

We are excited to continue working with you to accelerate your company’s digitization efforts. You’ll find the contract below and let me know if you have any questions.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 3: Here is…

This is a little less formal, but it’s short and sweet.

Example:

Hi Ed,

Congratulations on the promotion! Mr. Norton would love to discuss how company could make the transition easier for you; here’s a link to his calendar: [Add link to the tool.]

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 4: I’ve attached [item].

The sole purpose of using this statement is to ensure that the attachment doesn’t go unnoticed.

Example:

Matt,

I’ve attached a PDF with you that contains our SOPs – let me know if you have any questions.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 5: I’m sharing [item] with you.

You may use this statement to give a collaborative feel to the project you’ve undertaken.

Example:

Hi Daisy,

I’m sharing with you the meeting attendee list for the annual charity gala. Please let me know if you have any follow up questions.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 6: Please have a look at the attached [item].

You may use this statement when you have a document that you need the reader’s feedback on.

Example:

Hi Ed,

Thank you for your time during today’s meeting. Our team is currently developing the soiree invitiation and would like your feedback on which design you prefer.

Please take a look at the attached samples and let me know what you think is better by 6:00 PM EST, on Friday, March 15.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 7: This [item] has…

Just a simple, non-corporate-speak alternative.

Example:

Hello Adam,

Great talking to you on Friday and learning more about Windsor’s charity brunch to raise money for endangered birds. The pricing info that you asked for is attached to this email.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 8: Let me know if you have any questions about the attachment.

The sole purpose of this phrase is to let your reader know that you’re available for collaboration.

Example:

Hi Jack,

I did a little digging and found out the material cost for your project. I’m sharing an excel with you that lists all the items we’ll be using to craft the telescope.         

Let me know if you have any questions before our meeting tomorrow.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 9: Please review the attached [item] here.

This statement allows to get the reader’s feedback on the attached document.

Example:

Marie,

The attached creative includes new product reels launching in April 2021. Please let me know your selections so we can proceed.

Best,

Gracy

 

Option 10: Kindly check the attached [item] given here below.

This helps you highlight what the attached item is and what details it contains for your reader.

Example:

Hi Adam,

Thank you for attending our annual general meeting. Kindly check the attached presentation for more details about the company’s ’20 performance.

Best,

Gracy

 

Here’s a tip: If you’re sending a package to someone by postal service and you’ve enclosed something, the phrase “Enclosed herewith” is appropriate. If you’re sending an email attachment, you may want to call attention to the “attachment.”

 

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Diana Coker
Diana Coker is a staff writer at The HR Digest, based in New York. She also reports for brands like Technowize. Diana covers HR news, corporate culture, employee benefits, compensation, and leadership. She loves writing HR success stories of individuals who inspire the world. She’s keen on political science and entertains her readers by covering usual workplace tactics.

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